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Chemical suppression

peterjakab
Involved Contributor II
Involved Contributor II

Dear Community,

For the proper IC configuration very important the right suppression choice.

In this case the official guideline is very good:

https://assets.thermofisher.com/TFS-Assets/CMD/brochures/ST-71644-IC-Suppressor-ST71644-EN.pdf

I have some question about chemical suppressor:

1. Could be some sample type where more benefical to use chemical suppression? (for example, high hidrophobic content as waste water, or high transition metal content)

2. Is the chemical suppressor more stabel with dirty matrices?

3. Could we get lower CD background with it than electolytical suppression?

4. With small IC as Aquion, could be enough stabel the displacement regeneration for routine analysis?

Thank you!

Best regards,

Peter

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

The_Ion_Lady
Team TFS
Team TFS

Hello @peterjakab ,

Answers to your questions 😊,

1. Chemical suppressor is indeed better option for dirtier samples (not particulates) such as organics, wastewater etc. as you mentioned. If you are using organic solvents in your eluent or your samples are only soluble in organics then chemical suppression is a good choice.

2. The chemical suppressor is more robust with the dirtier matrices because there are no electrolytic reactions going on inside.

3. With an electrolytic suppressor especially hydroxide eluent, this is converted to water so the background is almost zero conductivity. While chemical suppression will still give you a level of conductance but will be much lower that your sample solution.

4. Many people use small IC such as Aquion (and Easion) to do displacement regeneration with chemical suppression but please be aware to ensure the liquid level with the regenerant is filled right to the top to ensure displacement. Also, you most change both eluent and regenerant bottles when the eluent bottle is empty...otherwise you will be running the eluent as your regenerant. Make sure you have the right DCR kit:

  • Dionex Displacement Chemical Regeneration (DCR) kit and 2L anion regenerant bottle
  • Dionex Displacement Chemical Regeneration (DCR) kit and 2L cation regenerant bottle

Good luck!

View solution in original post

3 REPLIES 3

Molly_I2
Community Manager
Community Manager

Hi @peterjakab great questions and happy to see you were ablet to utilize the IC suppressor brochure. I will let the team know of your questions and hope to get you some commentary on the topics soon! Hope you had a great weekend.

The_Ion_Lady
Team TFS
Team TFS

Hello @peterjakab ,

Answers to your questions 😊,

1. Chemical suppressor is indeed better option for dirtier samples (not particulates) such as organics, wastewater etc. as you mentioned. If you are using organic solvents in your eluent or your samples are only soluble in organics then chemical suppression is a good choice.

2. The chemical suppressor is more robust with the dirtier matrices because there are no electrolytic reactions going on inside.

3. With an electrolytic suppressor especially hydroxide eluent, this is converted to water so the background is almost zero conductivity. While chemical suppression will still give you a level of conductance but will be much lower that your sample solution.

4. Many people use small IC such as Aquion (and Easion) to do displacement regeneration with chemical suppression but please be aware to ensure the liquid level with the regenerant is filled right to the top to ensure displacement. Also, you most change both eluent and regenerant bottles when the eluent bottle is empty...otherwise you will be running the eluent as your regenerant. Make sure you have the right DCR kit:

  • Dionex Displacement Chemical Regeneration (DCR) kit and 2L anion regenerant bottle
  • Dionex Displacement Chemical Regeneration (DCR) kit and 2L cation regenerant bottle

Good luck!

peterjakab
Involved Contributor II
Involved Contributor II

Dear @The_Ion_Lady 

Appreciate for the detailed answer!

Have a nice day!

Best regards

Peter